Overblog
Edit post Segui questo blog Administration + Create my blog
15 luglio 2014 2 15 /07 /luglio /2014 23:26

Steve Way, dopo aver cambiato drammaticamente stile di vita, rappresenterà l'Inghilterra nella Maratona ai prossimi Giochi del Commonwealth

Il britannico Steve Way sette anni fa era fortemente sovrappeso (quasi 105 chilogrammi) e soffriva di pressione alta, con una forte dipendenza nei confronti del fumo  (20 sigarette al giorno), dei cibi dei takeaway (junk food) e della cioccolata. Ai tempi dela scuola era quello che si imboscava quando c'erano gli allenamenti e le gare di Cross Country Ad un certo punto accadde che - come fanno molte persone - egli cominciasse a correre per migliorare la sua salute e per tentare di riprendere forma.
Solo che non si è più fermato: quella che avrebbe dovuto una sana abitudine salutista è divenuta presto progetto di vita ed impegno serrato.

Ora, dopo aver percorso più di 26.000 miglia di corsa (tra allenamenti e gare cui ha partecipato) e all'età non più giovanile (dal punto di vista dell'Atletica di punta) di 40 anni, è stato selezionato per rappresentare l'Inghilterra nella specialità di Maratona nei prossimi Giochi del Commonwealth che si terranno a Glasgow a fine Luglio. 
Quest'anno ha completato la Virgin Money London Marathon in 2h16'27, classificandosi 15° assoluto, mentre solo poche settimane dopo ha infranto il record britannico della 100 km, con il crono di 6h19'19, prestazione con la quale sarà uno dei favoriti al Campionato del Mondo 100 km IAU che avrà luogo a Doha il prossimo novembre.

Steve Way, dopo aver cambiato drammaticamente stile di vita, rappresenterà l'Inghilterra nella Maratona ai prossimi Giochi del Commonwealth(Fonte: Theguardian.com) Seven years ago Steve Way weighed 16 1/2 stone and had high-blood pressure, a 20-a-day habit and an addiction to takeaways and chocolate. So, like many other people, he began running to get fit. Only he didn’t stop. And 26,000 miles later – more than the circumference of the globe – and at the grand age of 40, he has been selected to run the marathon for England at next month’s Commonwealth Games.

It is a staggering, unprecedented, and almost fantastical tale. One that Way, who somehow fits in running 130-140 miles a week with a nine-to-five job in a bank, admits is “completely ridiculous”. And that might be understating it.

I am a one-man band: a self-coached club runner,” he says. “At school I was the guy who hid in the bushes with my fat mate during the first lap of the cross country and then rejoined the field when they came round again. I have never competed in a major championship before and until recently I had almost no contact with British Athletics. And now I will be running at the Commonwealth Games”.

You might call him athletics’ answer to Rocky Balboa, the underdog who got a surprise shot at the big time – except that instead of running up the 72 steps to the Philadelphia Museum of Art he sprints round the duck pond in Poole Park. And rather than punching slabs of beef in a meat-locker he has T-bone steaks with oven chips for tea as a treat.

But Way’s dizzying ascent from club runner to international athlete did not require a scriptwriter. It came about from hard slog, geeky attention to detail, and an under-the-radar performance at this year’s London marathon on 13 April. Having started in a group for sub two-hour-45-minute athletes, a minute behind the elite field containing Mo Farah and the world record holder Wilson Kipsang, he ended up overtaking several established athletes before finishing 15th in two hours, 16 minutes and 27 seconds.

He had beaten his personal best by nearly three minutes, and was the third British athlete home after Farah and Chris Thompson. And, crucially, he finished 33 seconds under the qualifying standard for the Commonwealth Games. Afterwards the stewards attempted to usher him to the tent where the marathon’s biggest stars were having their post-run massages and recovery drinks. “Er, my kit is over that way with everyone else’s,” he told them.

Incredibly – a word that keeps coming to mind when you hear Way tell his story – the London marathon was not his main target. He only decided to compete eight days beforehand. All his training had been focused on breaking the UK 100km record, something he achieved at the British Championships at the start of May. His time of 6:19.19, an average of 6.06 per mile over 62 miles, was 46 minutes clear of his nearest rival.

“Part of me can’t quite believe how well I did in London because of the improvement I made,” he says. “But I also think I didn’t actually give it 100% because I recovered so quickly and my legs didn’t feel like I had put them through much.”

Way’s final marathon preparations were hardly ideal either. While the elite field spent the night before the race at luxury hotels, he slept in a camper van parked on his cousin’s drive to save money. The $1,500 (£896) he earned for finishing in under 2:17 was the most he has ever won from athletics. “My wife, Sarah, is an accountant and likes to keep track of my income and outgoings from running,” he explains. “Last year I just about broke even when you take into account travelling to races.”

So where did this hidden talent come from? It wasn’t evident at school. Or during the next 15 years. Instead Way’s life followed an unexceptional pattern: every so often he tried to lose weight by eating healthily and jogging – and a few weeks later he always gave up.

Yet Way sensed he might be “a little bit different” when he entered his first marathon in 2006 on a whim and, after three week’s training, finished in a highly respectable 3:07.08 despite being “a fat bloke bouncing along next to club runners”. But then he didn’t put on a pair of running shoes for 18 months.

Towards the end of 2007 I could hardly sleep at night,” he says. “I was coughing and waking up because of the smoking and it was impacting on my wife too. At that point half our meals were takeaways and I would eat chocolate and sweets all the time. I was 16 1/2 stone and realised I had to do something radically different to break the cycle.

And so he did. He quit smoking and fast-food and began jogging, and before long was following a 24-week plan from the book Advanced Marathoning. He aimed to break three hours at the 2008 London Marathon. Instead he ran it in 2:35. “I came 100th and the concept of finishing in the top 100 was just awesome,” he says. “So at that point I joined an athletics club and started to take it more seriously.”

In 2009 he ran London in 2:25 despite injuring his hamstring the week before. He collapsed when he crossed the line, having torn most of the muscles around his pelvis, and was on crutches for weeks. Yet the thirst for self-improvement only grew. In 2010, helped by advice from the British Olympic marathon runner Liz Yelling, he broke 2:20 for the very first time.

But for the next three years, progress slowed. He tried upping his mileage to 160 miles a week but his body rebelled and his heart rate briefly shot up by 30 beats a minute. He was injured a few times, most frustratingly just before the 2013 London marathon when in “unbelievable” shape. So he decided to try an international 100 km race and, having won it by over 40 minutes, returned to the marathon where he smashed his personal best this year.

The key, he thinks, is that he recovers so quickly from long, fast runs. “I don’t seem to put my body under that much stress when I do marathon-pace type efforts,” he explains. “Even doing back-to-back long runs at the weekend, when I might do a marathon on the Saturday and 40 miles on the Sunday my body seems to accept it quite nicely”.

The athlete runs twice a day – either before work or during his lunch break, then again in the evening. He plans to take only one day off from now until the Commonwealth Games. “I really don’t feel any better after a complete non-run day,” he says. “So if I need a rest I just do a six-mile jog”.

Way can tell you about all of his runs since 2007: the distance, the pace, how he felt. It has all been tracked. Even when he runs, he thinks about running. “I am a bit of a running nerd,” he sighs, in a self-deprecating fashion. There is a touch of Hugh Laurie about him, something charming, lovable and slightly eccentric.

So how well could he do in Glasgow? “Obviously you can’t count out a medal because you never know what will happen but realistically, with the high-quality Kenyans in the field, I’d be stupid to think it’s likely,” he says. “But I have no fear about stepping up and I’m aiming to improve my PB and break the British record for a 40-year-old.

A more realistic medal chance will come at the 100 km World Championship in Doha in November. If Way can run under 6:20 again he will be in the mix for a gold medal – something that both staggers and excites him. “I still struggle to see myself as a proper athlete,” he says. “I am just a man who has got quite obsessed with his hobby and can’t put it to rest".

To be honest, I wasn’t really expecting to move to the next level but I surprised myself. So now I am asking – what else could there be for me?".

Condividi post

Repost0

commenti

Presentazione

  • : Ultramaratone, maratone e dintorni
  • : Una pagina web per parlare di podismo agonistico - di lunga durata e non - ma anche di pratica dello sport sostenibile e non competitivo
  • Contatti

About

  • Ultramaratone, maratone e dintorni
  • Mi chiamo Maurizio Crispi. Sono un runner con oltre 200 tra maratone e ultra: ancora praticante per leisure, non gareggio più. Da giornalista pubblicista, oltre ad alimentare questa pagina collaboro anche con altre testate non solo sportive.
  • Mi chiamo Maurizio Crispi. Sono un runner con oltre 200 tra maratone e ultra: ancora praticante per leisure, non gareggio più. Da giornalista pubblicista, oltre ad alimentare questa pagina collaboro anche con altre testate non solo sportive.



Etnatrail 2013 - si svolgerà il 4 agosto 2013


Ricerca

Il perchè di questo titolo

DSC04695.jpegPerchè ho dato alla mia pagina questo titolo?

Volevo mettere assieme deio temi diversi eppure affini: prioritariamente le ultramaratone (l'interesse per le quali porta con sè ad un interesse altrettanto grande per imprese di endurance di altro tipo, riguardanti per esempio il nuoto o le camminate prolungate), in secondo luogo le maratone.

Ma poi ho pensato che non si poteva prescindere dal dare altri riferimenti come il podismo su altre distanze, il trail e l'ultratrail, ma anche a tutto ciò che fa da "alone" allo sport agonistico e che lo sostanzia: cioè, ho sentito l'esigenza di dare spazio a tutto ciò che fa parte di un approccio soft alle pratiche sportive di lunga durata, facendoci rientrare anche il camminare lento e la pratica della bici sostenibile. Secondo me, non c'è possibilità di uno sport agonistico che esprima grandi campioni, se non c'è a fare da contorno una pratica delle sue diverse forme diffusa e sostenibile. 

Nei "dintorni" della mia testata c'è dunque un po' di tutto questo: insomma, tutto il resto.

Archivi

Come nasce questa pagina?

DSC04709.jpeg_R.jpegL'idea motrice di questo nuovo web site è scaturita da una pagina Facebook che ho creato, con titolo simile ("Ultramaratone, maratone e dintorni"), avviata dall'ottobre 2010, con il proposito di dare spazio e visibilità  ad una serie di materiali sul podismo agonistico e non, ma anche su altri sport, che mi pervenivano dalle fonti più disparate e nello stesso tempo per avere un "contenitore" per i numerosi servizi fotografici che mi capitava di realizzare.

La pagina ha avuto un notevole successo, essendo di accesso libero per tutti: dalla data di creazione ad oggi, sono stati più di 64.000 i contatti e le visite.

L'unico limite di quella pagina era nel fatto che i suoi contenuti non vengono indicizzati su Google e in altri motori di ricerca e che, di conseguenza, non risultava agevole la ricerca degli articoli sinora pubblicati (circa 340 alla data - metà aprile 2011 circa - in cui ho dato vita a Ultrasport Maratone e dintorni).

Ho tuttavia lasciato attiva la pagina FB come contenitore dei link degli articoli pubblicati su questa pagina web e come luogo in cui continuerò ad aprire le gallerie fotografiche relative agli eventi sportivi - non solo podistici - che mi trovo a seguire.

L'idea, in ogni caso, è quella di dare massimo spazio e visibilità non solo ad eventi di sport agonistico ma anche a quelli di sport "sostenibile" e non competitivo...

Il mio curriculum: sport e non solo

 

banner tre rifugi Val Pellice 194x109

IAU logo 01
  NatureRace header
BannerRunnerMania.JPG
 banner-pubblicitario-djd.gif
VeniceUltramarathonFestival
supermaratonadelletna.jpg
LogoBlog 01
runlovers
atletica-notizie-01.jpg


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pagine

Gli articoli più letti negli ultimi 30 giorni

 

ultrasportheader950.gif

 

 

Gli articoli più visti dal 24/03/2014 al 24/04/2014

Mobile Virgin Money London Marathon 2014 (33^ ed.). L'evento è stato… 2 303
Articolo Virgin Money London Marathon 2014 (33^ ed.). L'evento è stato… 1 728
Home Ultramaratone, maratone e dintorni 579
Mobile Maratona del Lamone 2014. Podisti fanatici e ignoranti affermano: Ti… 247
Articolo Ciao, Carmelo! Il commiato di Elena Cifali - Ultramaratone, maratone… 241
Articolo Corsa, fatalità e senso di responsabilità - Ultramaratone, maratone e… 236
Mobile Ciao, Carmelo! Il commiato di Elena Cifali - Ultramaratone, maratone… 223
Mobile UltraMilano-Sanremo 2014 (1^ ed.). Il sapore della sfida, a pochi… 206
Articolo UltraMilano-Sanremo 2014 (1^ ed.). Il sapore della sfida, a pochi… 196
Mobile Virgin Money London Marathon 2014 (34^ ed.). L'evento è stato… 134
Articolo Maratona del Lamone 2014. Podisti fanatici e ignoranti affermano: Ti… 118
Mobile A 98 anni suonati Giuseppe Ottaviani fa incetta di Ori a Campionati… 104
Mobile Corsa, fatalità e senso di responsabilità - Ultramaratone, maratone e… 103
Articolo A 98 anni suonati Giuseppe Ottaviani fa incetta di Ori a Campionati… 102

 

Statistiche generali del magazine dalla sua creazione, aggiornate al 14.04.2014

Data di creazione 12/04/2011
Pagine viste : 607 982 (totale)
Visitatori unici 380 449
Giornata record 14/04/2014 (3 098 Pagine viste)
Mese record 09/2011 (32 745 Pagine viste)
Precedente giornata record 22/04/2012 con 2847 pagine viste
Record visitatori unici in un giorno 14/04/2014 (2695 vis. unici)
Iscritti alla Newsletter 148
Articoli pubblicati 4259


Categorie

I collaboratori

Lara arrivo pisa marathon 2012  arrivo attilio siracusa 2012
            Lara La Pera    Attilio Licciardi
 Elena Cifali all'arrivo della Maratona di Ragusa 2013  Eleonora Suizzo alla Supermaratona dell'Etna 2013 (Foto di Maurizio Crispi)
            Elena Cifali   Eleonora Suizzo
   
   
   
   
   
   

ShinyStat

Statistiche